Viewing entries in
Articles

Roberto Alegria | Olympus Pro Photographer Showdown 2018

Roberto Alegria | Olympus Pro Photographer Showdown 2018

Enjoy some really dope photo visuals from our fellow photographer Roberto Alegria on his first ever video edit for the Olympus Pro Photographer Showdown 2018. Ten years of pure skateboarding in thirty different countries, best way to celebrate the international Go Skateboarding Day

Sirus Gahan | Palestine

Sirus Gahan | Palestine

Sirus Gahan

Filmmaker, cinematographer and skateboarder

 

We are happy to bring you this inspiring and hopeful life story, of how skateboarding is a vehicle to open the doors to a better understanding of the world we live in, expand horizons and grow as a human being. A ray of hope amid so much destruction and desolation that unites people beyond borders, ethnic groups, cultures or religions.
I hope you enjoy Siru story and support SkatePal in this commendable task they carry out.

 

 

Palestine1.jpg

My name is Sirus Gahan

I’m a skateboarder, filmmaker and cinematographer.

For one of my birthdays I was gifted with a small MiniDV video camera, a perfectly sized handy cam that I kept in my bag. As most of my summer days were spent skateboarding, this became my main focus, with many sessions being captured on tape. Behind the camera quickly became where I felt most comfortable, and through my passion for filming skateboarding I became interested in other areas of filmmaking.

Palestine 4.jpeg

Sirus

Filming the moment

I arrived in Tel Aviv as the summer war of 2014 was coming to an end. Newly formed charity SkatePAL were looking for skate volunteers to fly to Palestine to help with the project they had set up there. SkatePAL had established a youth project in the West Bank to help teach kids to skateboard and they needed volunteers to run sessions with the kids, assist in the building of skateparks and to bring in skateboarding equipment for the use of the children. There are no skate shops in the country and unfortunately, few citizens have the privilege of being able to cross the border to Israel. I saw the early potential SkatePAL had and realised that there was the chance to tell an incredible story, from a lesser-seen region of the world. I immediately booked my ticket.

Before crossing the checkpoints into Ramallah, the explosions from not-so-distant missiles could be heard and a siren warning us of such dangers emanated abruptly through the warm air. Having travelled pretty extensively, I thought I was ready for anything. However, this introduction was a shock to the system, and my first taste of what everyday life was like here.

My mornings in Palestine were spent exploring the streets and markets, absorbing the smells of fresh falafel and sage tea that seemed to trail through the air, enticing me around every corner. When the afternoon came around and the kids finished school, the other volunteers and I would run skate sessions at the local youth club. Here we had built a wooden mini-ramp and a multitude of other obstacles for the participants to use as they learned. Teaching skateboarding in late summer in the Middle East was something my body was not ready for. In addition to the climate, trying to teach children who only spoke Arabic (of which I know about 3 words) meant a lot of instructions were misunderstood. Thankfully, skateboarding is a language in itself, and being able to physically demonstrate how to do something is often the easiest way to teach techniques that are so reliant on body and movement, particularly when your students are so intrigued and energetic. Skateboarding was entirely new to Palestine and the excitement it created among the kids we encountered was almost palpable. A task that should have been simple, like fetching the pads from the lock-up at the youth centre, was a marathon effort, as 30 grasping hands would fly up into the air around you, trying desperately to snatch at the limited equipment, and thus securing their turn on one of the boards we had brought into the country.
 

Palestine3.jpg

Palestinian kid 

Happy with the skateboard

In the evenings, after our sessions teaching the children had ended, the other volunteers and I would wander into the centre of whichever town we were situated in and find ourselves a shawarma to re-energise. From here, we’d scour the dusty streets, hunting for smooth surfaces and skateable, marble obstacles. The heat of the day was debilitating and although we’d try to skate, we would end up dehydrated and sunburnt which in turn would leave us too fried to complete the rest of the days’ tasks. As a result, we generally stuck to skating in the evenings.

Skateboarding was so new to the country, that going out to film tricks in the streets was often a surreal experience. In the West, skateboarding is often shunned and seen as a nuisance, but in the West Bank we would often draw crowds of 30 to 40 wide-eyed civilians, cheering and showing their support. Locals were happy to perform for the camera and would often show me a magic trick or a dance move, all of which feature in the films made during my travels.

Of all the places I’ve been lucky enough to visit, Palestine is certainly the most memorable. During my time there, the nation was politically volatile, the atmosphere on the streets was tense. Yet, the experience I had was nothing but open arms and pure good will. Seeing these kids experience the thrill of rolling just a few feet allowed me to relive the same excitement of first discovering skateboarding. What I witnessed gave me a great sense of hope for the future of the Palestinian youth.

Skateboarding is so significant to me. It has taken me to destinations all over the globe and provided me with a physical, mental and creative outlet. Being part of something that’s allowed me to work all over the world is very special. Traveling is something that I’d always longed to do, I felt like it was an inherent part of me. Skateboarding is my vessel to new worlds where I’m able to experience different places, people and cultures. I believe that it’s vital to have a wide and varied experience of the world. Collect stories and learn about global differences. Develop your understanding of the world you live in, and those that inhabit it. I believe that doing these things today are more important than ever before.

Go Skateboarding Day | Recap

Go Skateboarding Day | Recap

The last Wednesday 21st of June Be Skateboarding Mag supported by Nike SB held an event in Macba and Parallel to celebrate the ´Go Skateboarding Day´. It took place a Best Trick contest up to 350€ prize money each at Macba big 3, Parallel Manual Pads and Longest Ollie to end up with energy, fun and a slice of pizza. Many skaters from different nationalities gathered together to destroy every spot, amazing skating and sick tricks all over the place. Take a look to the awesome video recap to check what went down and enjoy below a cool photo gallery by Roger Ferrero

Many thanks to everyone who came to join us to celebrate the Go Skateboarding Day, you´re all winners!

Macba Big 3 → Nollie Double Flip & SW Double Flip → Lennon Frassetti

Parallel Manual Pad → 360 Flip Nose Manual Nollie Inward Heelflip → Jorge Simoes

Longest OllieJorge Calderón, Bruno Silva, Pol Catena, Shaun Hover

 

Filmed by Enrique Mayor & Nico Cook

Edited by Enrique Mayor

Supported by Nike SB


Photography by Roger Ferrero

Levi’s® Skateboarding | The Byrrrh & Skate Project

Levi’s® Skateboarding | The Byrrrh & Skate Project

Youssef Abaoud

Designer & Constructer 

Levi’s® Skateboarding proudly presents: ‘The Byrrrh & Skate Project’, a local DIY skate build in an old factory close to Gare du Midi, Brussels, designed and constructed by Youssef Abaoud; a local skater from Dour, Belgium.
 
First started 3 years ago, following the closure of the infamous Roller Park in Anderlecht, Belgium, skateboarders were left with nowhere to go when the weather turned bleak. Trying to find an empty, sheltered spaced space without security guards was tough, and skateboarders were shunned everywhere they went. Because of this, Youssef started collecting scraps of wood, waste materials as well as old skate ramps and built a number of pop up DIY ramps in old abandoned buildings to enable him and his friends to skate during the winter months.

This was around the time that local skateboarders found themselves having to build places outside of the city so that they wouldn’t get caught by the local authorities. Not long after the Roller Park closed, some skateboarders built a DIY spot under a motorway with cement which was a cool idea but was hard to skate and even harder to get to if you didn’t drive. Throughout this time there were also lots of DIY attempts around the city where local skateboarders would assemble miniramps in their favourite spots but you had to know the right people, in the right space, at the right time to drop in. 

One day whilst on a job in Laeken, Youssef came across an abandoned warehouse that he used to work in. It was empty, dry, lit-up, had smooth floors and was vacant until further notice. Over a number of weeks, Youssef and his friends set up some ramps and as word started to spread, more and more people were eager to visit and lend a helping hand. This was the start of The Byrrrh: a name that was founded from a sign that hung over the doorway of the warehouse; a popular French aperitif. 

Contest Crowded

The Byrrrh was a space open to all and all that was asked for in return was a couple of euros to keep the ramps in shape and the fridge stocked. For two winters The Byrrrh was going strong until the property had a change in ownership and everyone had to vacant the premises. 

The second phase of The Byrrrh took place further afield in Evere; a quiet suburb more commonly known by the skaters as a place to skate marble forecourts and curbs of local businesses on weekends. Here, Youssef and his friends came across an old, expansive television studio where there was space to build bigger and better obstacles like a corner quarterpipe. The old fridge found a new home in one of the small rooms where a bar was set up to serve food and drink to all who visited. One of the small adjoining rooms was also used as an art studio where old boards were used as a blank canvas and exhibited within the space. Everything seemed to be falling into place nicely until unfortunately the building was needed once again and so everyone packed up and moved out. 


Since then, Youssef and his friends set out on a mission to create a permeant community based indoor skate park where all skaters from Brussels and beyond could visit throughout the year. Made up of donated wood, confiscated skate obstacles, recycled waste and concrete, the 945m2 park underneath the railway arches is an open space otherwise known as a ‘Byrrrh’, that offers itself to all skaters: any age, any level, 7 days a week, 24 hours a day.

On Saturday 6th May, Levi’s® Skateboarding supported the launch of The Byrrrh & Skate Project by hosting The Byrrrh Jam: an event that officially opened the park to locals and skateboarders from across Europe. Throughout the day, Levi’s® skateboarding holded a number of small events and activities including; an under 18 skate competition, live music by La Jungle, a photography exhibition about Youssef’s work to date and The Byrrrh story and a 18+ cash prize skate competition as well as  food, drink and good times!


Enjoy an awesome photo gallery by Al_Bo below to watch what went down during the opening day!

Photography by Al_Bo

Hélas x adidas Skateboarding | Paris

Hélas x adidas Skateboarding | Paris


Lucas Puig, fellow Frenchmen Clement Brunel and Stephen Khou of Hélas have teamed up with adidas Skateboarding to bring you the ultimate in classic 80s tennis fashion. Built for all surfaces, the collaboration with Hélas offers new head to toe silhouettes ready to take on the court. Prepare yourself for a neon-fueled exploration of 80s indulgence. adidas and Hélas, Tied for the best!

Be Skateboarding Mag were invited to the launch party in Paris, take a look below of the awesome event in two different photo galleries, the first one by Roger Ferrero and second one by Nils Reuter

Click on images to enlarge

Photography by Roger Ferrero


Take a deeper look of what went down last weekend in Paris through the cool photo gallery below, enjoy!

Photography by Nils Reuter

David Stenström | Homegrown

David Stenström | Homegrown

Converse Cons alongside Free Skate Mag brings you some inspirational and emotional film featuring David Stenström from Stockholm, Sweden. Also enjoy an awesome photo gallery by Nils Svenson below, check it out!

Filmed & Edited by Dan Magee

Additional filming by George Nevin


Photography by Nils Svenson

Dennis Busenitz | 10 Years On Adidas

Dennis Busenitz | 10 Years On Adidas

10 Questions to Celebrate 10 Years of Busenitz on Adidas

 

The house where Dennis grew up in Munich→ Photo by Conny Mirbach

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? WHAT´S YOUR AGE?

I´m 35 years old, grew up in Munich and moved to the States with my family at 15 years old to Newton, Kansas.

WHAT WERE THE VIDEOS OR SECTIONS THAT INFLUENCED YOU THE MOST BACK IN THE DAYS? WHAT SKATERS?

My first video was “Ban This” from Powel Peralta, I liked a lot probably influenced me a lot. When I really got in skating the “Mouse” video influenced me a lot. Marino´s part and Sheffey, Carrol, all those guys, all those great skaters in that video.

AND NOWADAYS?

Nowadays just radom parts on internet as everyone else, whatever is hot at the moment.

WHAT VIDEO PART IT WAS THE HARDEST TO ACHIVE?

The “Away Days” part it was probably the one that I try the hardest for, the other ones always just kind of came together, that was like my most “serious” part or whatever.

WHAT DO YOU RATHER TO SKATE WITH? CLASSIC MODELS OR YOU ARE OPEN TO TRY NEW INNOVATIONS THAT A COMPANY LIKE ADIDAS COULD PROVIDE?

I like trying new innovations, I just find a lot of times that like people which just called gimmick new innovations they are just like bullshit but if there´s really something new and really something that´s better I´m down to try it.

HOW IS THE PROCESS TO DESING YOUR SHOES ON ADIDAS?

I´ve just told them what I wanted, they knew how to make it and knew what not to make

You just have a basic idea for shoes and sat down with designers start talking about it, making samples, looking at all shoes and getting different ideas from older shoes and putting together in my shoe. My first time making the shoes, I´ve just told them what I wanted, they knew how to make it and knew what not to make. Just makes samples, the first samples never like you wanted, they just did like three samples or something, by the end it was time that we had to put something out, we didnt have time to change it anymore but we also got to a point were it´s good enough and that´s the shoes that came out.

FS Kickflip→ Photo by Conny Mirbach

RECENTLY IT HAS BEEN CONFIRMED SKATEBOARDING AS A OLYMPIC SPORT IN 2020. WHAT´S YOUR OPINION ABOUT?

I don´t know… I think is pretty cool that it is recognize that is something more than just punks going out graffity, I think it is extremely hard, it´s difficult.

I think is pretty cool that it is recognize that is something more than just punks going out graffity

WOULD YOU BE DOWN TO GO TO THE OLYMPICS IF YOU HAVE THE CHANCE TO?

[laughs] I will be like 40, I don´t have any bussiness in the Olimpics. It´s pretty gnarly, that´s where real athlete goes, I don´t really consider myself that but I dont wanna say that skateboarding is not a sport and all that shit ´cause there are people that are athletes in skateboarding and they do incredible stuff, it´s cool that they can have that legitime place to show that, I guess. People get really upset about it, I don´t really get upset about it. If skateboarding is not a sport then its an art, right? What are the other options? Whatever the not sport part skateboading is I´m sure that´s not gonna die or go away, some comedy can´t really change what skateboarding is.

Just when I skate I try to have fun whithout killing myself, I don´t think is necessary to destroy yourself to skateboard

DO YOU WORK OUT, GO TO THE GYM OR STRETCH TO MAINTAIN LONGEVITY IN SKATEBOARDING?

I don´t believe in the gym, I don´t strecht, sometimes strecht before, I  probably should more, I just eat whatever I like really, I try to stay healthy and not eat like garbage, drink water. Just when I skate I try to have fun whithout killing myself, I don´t think is necessary to destroy yourself to skateboard. Sometimes  I ride my bicycle but not like Lance Amstrong or anything just more relax riding.  I might change too,  I feel like maybe I should be doing something more to maintain my body, I think meditading might be the best thing for me anyway, since is like more the control center that´s the problem.

BS Flip switch manual→ Photo by Conny Mirbach

you better make sure that you like it at whatever stage you are at.

ANY ADVICE FOR THE KIDS WHO LOOK UP TO YOU OR ARE TRYING TO ACHIVE A SKATEBOARDING CAREER?

Yeah don´t try to achive a career, just skate and have fun. Whatever you get out of skating at this point is what you are gonna get out when you get your name on a shoe or board, when you have your career does not really change, so you better make sure that you like it at whatever stage you are at.

WHAT ARE THE FUTURE PLANS?

I don´t know… stay healthy, spend time with my family, keep skating, just life whatever that´s means.  Get through four years of Trump [laughs] that´s goes for the whole world.

ANY LAST WORDS?

Keep up peaceful, don't take at all ladies skating down the side blocs


Cons One Star Pro 90´s Testing | Daniel Quintero

Cons One Star Pro 90´s Testing | Daniel Quintero

Click on images to enlarge

Downhill → Photo by Roger Ferrero

WHAT GENERATION DO YOU BELONG TO? THE 90´S OR DO YOU STARTED TO SKATE IN THE 2000´S?

I started skating in 2004 without knowing what it was exactly, I asked to my parents to get one because my friends had it and we did downhills sitting on the board and did the Thug until we discovered what was possible to do with it . Little changed from what we did before.

WHAT WERE THE VIDEOS OR SECTIONS THAT INFLUENCED YOU THE MOST FROM THE 90´S? WHAT SKATERS?

Uff I like many videos from the 90´s:
1281 New Deal and Useless Wooden Toys, especially the part of Danny Sargent and Ed Templeton.
Memory Screen by Alien Workshop, both videos by Mad Circle, G & S footage, Neil Blender part and Lance Mountain in Ban This video. Debunker which is the favorite video of Jano. A visual sound of Stereo and one of my favorite parts featuring Gonz and Guy Mariano in the Blind - Video Days.

SKATEBOARDERS ARE OFTEN QUITE CONSERVATIVE IN WHAT REFERS TO THE MATERIAL. FEW INNOVATIONS AND ARE OPTING FOR SIMPLE AND ICONIC MODELS FROM THE PAST, CLASSICS. WHAT DO YOU RATHER TO SKATE WITH? CLASSIC MODELS OR YOU ARE OPEN TO TRY NEW INNOVATIONS THAT A COMPANY LIKE CONVERSE CONS COULD PROVIDE?

I like to wear comfortable sneakers that feels good to skate with simple design, it does not matter if they are classic or not. Well, if they would release skate sneakers that shoot lasers and are uncomfortable ... I would not care and would wear them forever. (You never know when you're going to need some sneakers with lasers rays)

Cons One Star Pro Mid 90´s → Photo by Roger Ferrero

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE CONVERSE CONS ONE STAR MID 90´S? ARE THEY COMFORTABLE? BOARD FEEL?

Cons One Star Pro Mid 90´s after a month of skating → Photo by Roger Ferrero

It´s cool that they make shoes from the 90´s, besides I am a supporter of the high and half shoes. They really surprised me because normally  when you get the new shoes they feel hard and not much board feel, but the one star mid felt pretty well from the first minute, comfortable and resist, you would rather change them because they get soft than ´cause they fall apart. 

DO YOU REMEMBER SOME CONVERSE SKATE TEAM MEMBERS FROM THE 90'S? WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE SKATER OF THAT TEAM?

Uff ..  I could search for it on the internet but I get lazy ... The only one I remember is Kenny Anderson, but I think there were like a thousand... Well also Kenny is the king. (and even more with sneakers that shoot laser rays)

RECENTLY IT HAS BEEN CONFIRMED SKATEBOARDING AS A OLYMPIC SPORT IN 2020. WHAT´S YOUR OPINION ABOUT?


FUCK OLYMPIC GAMES!! hahahah no, just kidding.
Actually I don´t care, I do not feel identified at all with that and I'll look at it as I do when I watch tennis. There´s people that hate it and people that support it, but things will never be as before and they always progress. I will not get hyped on it until lightsaber battles are set to the Olympics.

IN THE 90'S TRENDS, STYLES WERE MORE UNDERGROUND AND GENUINE. SKATEBOARDING BEGAN TO TREND-BUT IN AN ALTERNATIVE OR SMALLER GROUP. DO YOU PREFER IT SO? OR DO YOU PREFER IT TO BE MORE OPEN AS NOWADAYS WHERE SKATE TRENDS ARE QUICKLY ADOPTED BY THE REST AND VICE VERSA?

The Crew → Photo by Roger Ferrero

 I prefer to ride down the street and be called delincuent instead of being treat like a circus monkey and yelling at me to do an ollie by a child with footballer haircut and a shirt to his ankles, I do not know how was skateboarding in the 90´s, I started to skate when it was already big, but from what I have been told and seen, I prefer by far how it was back then, closed and for "not cool" people. I think there has been a radical change from the 90´s untill today, I always liked the 90´s because I feel identified with what they did and how they did it, there were no mobiles devices and stuff ... But I won´t go that road because it is very typical, even I use it a lot, but I really would like to live as they lived in the '90s.


HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT TOP MODELS, JUSTIN BIEBER, RIHANNA WEARING THRASHER T-SHIRT?

I do not care, they can wear whatever they want, as now everybody wear Polo, Hilfiger ... And those brands that do not make scandal.

IS THERE ANYTHING YOU WOULD CHANGE FROM THE 90'S? SOMETHING REMARKABLE FROM THAT TIME?

Outside skateboarding: I would had done more Zelda games.
From skateboarding: I would have hidden drugs from many skaters that life is fucked up because of them
And remarkable things ...
Outside skateboarding: all Zelda games and the movie: Kids
From skateboarding: that there was no instagram


Enjoy this awesome edit by Dani Millán featuring Converse Cons riders Dani Quintero, Brayan Albarenga, Miguel Prieto, and Pepe García testing the One Star Mid 90´s!

Music by: Spinmeister - Burning The Micro Waves


Photography by Roger Ferrero

Cons One Star Pro 90´s | Octavio Barrera

Cons One Star Pro 90´s | Octavio Barrera

ONE STAR PRO 90’S

 

Welcome to the new Converse Cons bi-monthly Spain newsletter. Containing everything you need to know, from up and coming products and events to ambassador interviews and just about everything in between. As this is the first of our newsletters we wanted to make this one extra special. That being said, Below you will find a quick Octavio Barrera Interview, along with a great ambassador gallery, enjoy!


 

OCTAVIO BARRERA

 

Converse Cons One Star was first launched in 1974 as a shoe adapted for basketball. Until 90's decade were not popular in the skateboarding scene by Spike Jonze as seen in the epic Guy Mariano video part "Mouse" Girl/Chocolate movie, there were even ads with him.

 

What were the videos or sections that influenced you the most from the 90´s? What skaters?

 

Photo by Sam Ashley

They are videos that I've seen later, I belong to the 2000's but some parts that are amazing and I think a lot of skating today revolves around them are: Mike Carrol on The Questionable video (Plan B) or Underachievers video of Eastern Exposure 3 (Dan Wolfe) Ricky Oyola switch ollie bs shifty in the middle of a line.

Did you start to skate in this decade or 2000´s?

 

I belong to the 2000's, actually I started to skate in that precise year. I was born in 1990 and at ten years old got my first own skateboard.

 

Skateboarders are often quite conservative in what refers to the material. Few innovations and are opting for simple and iconic models from the past, classics. What do you rather to skate with? Classic models or you are open to try new innovations that a company like Converse Cons could provide?

 

It depends, there are factors involved in these elections. Aesthetically: I really like classic models from Converse Cons like One Star, but for instance if I would skate every day in a plaza possibly would wear Chuck Taylors. As current favorite model I choose the Break Point, they feel as  a glove on your feet, perfect from day one.

 

In the 90's the legendary skater Francis Barrera was the only or among the really few ones who could land McTwist in Spain. At a time when there was no internet and media were so limited to even imagine a career as a skateboarder. Is he your cousin or relative? Did you start to skate with him? In what way influenced you at the beginning? Did he help you out to open some doors?

 

I always say that I would have loved to witness his best years of skating. It had to be amazing, coming to a contest and see Francis with hair colored flying above the coping by a couple of meters high! I would pay to see a contest from that time. Also nowadays when he shows up by "El Refugio" skatepark where we skate in Las Palmas, he is mindblowing, just so gifted!

 

Francis is my second cousin, but he plays a bigger roll! When I started to ride he took me to the skatepark and helped me a lot to understand how it worked, showing respect to the older dudes etc .., without him I would have had probably a couple of injures hahaha. Also he helped me out to meet up with the skateboarding scene in Canary Islands as he is a legend anywhere you go!

Nosepick → Photo by Sam Ashley

 

Do you remember some Converse skate team members from the 90's? What was your favorite skater of that team? Is Kenny Anderson the only member remaining nowadays?

 

I do not remember to be honest, but surely would have chosen Kenny Anderson, to me he is a gifted skater, details that makes the different and that´s for me a skater!

 

Recently it has been confirmed skateboarding as a Olympic sport in 2020. What´s your opinion about?

 

As usual! Everything is skateboarding hahaha, really? Even though they are a thousand factors that affect this confirmation. I think it has its good and bad as everything else. Although as personal opinion I think that skateboarding is more than a sport, it is a culture, street art, a way of being, living, dressing ... but since a few years ago skateboarding has been taking as a more serious profession than just hanging out with your friends to explore the streets, film everything around it and freeze those moments. Today it is very different. As good side would say it will reflect even more riders going into that direction of those seeking another kind of fun;), there will be more money and subsidies for skateboarding equals more parks, more aids etc ..., but I can not imagine a busted gang of skaters into a high performance center having breakfast alongside with Olympic shooting team hahaha

 

In the 90's trends, styles were more underground and genuine. Skateboarding began to trend-but in an alternative or smaller group. Do you prefer it so? Or do you prefer it to be more open as nowadays where skate trends are quickly adopted by the rest and vice versa?

 

360 Flip → Photo by Sam Ashely

I rather preferred it that way. Also in the 2000's we experienced what you mentioned. Back in the days when I started to go traveling to skateboarding around 2003-04, possibly we were like 2-4 people in the Canary Islands doing the same thing (Orlando Acosta, Pali Negrin, Jose de La Rosa, Miguel Castro ...) some others probably! You'd go to contests and everyone knew each other as a little family. I remember the first trips to Bilbao with Alai Skateboards. When I mentioned in high school they looked at me weird. It had to go my grandmother or my parents to ask permission as it was something important blablabla. Nowadays it is much more usual.

Skateboarding as everything else has been affected by new technologies. Before it seemed most intriguing, an uncertainty that today's kids are not going to experience unless they all agree to through away their phones (that's not going to happen, right?) Hahaha, If you knew that someone was filming for a video part, you would get so hype like: wow what is he filming... and that would get you motivated. As today just a click away from get to see everything is going on around the world hahaha so you just try to adapt without affecting your principles.

 

Often skateboarding goes in circles, trends and fashions come and go to return. Lately young guys use rails under the board and they dress kind of like in the early 90's. Do you think this recycling will occur with other trends of the 90's? Can you picture yourself skating with larger shoes and baggy clothes? What trends from the 90´s can resurface?

 

These tendentious circles affects it all, not just to skateboarding. But indeed, it is true that you go to skate nowadays to a spot and it seems that there´s a mandatory uniform (no need for description) hahaha but this is also cool because you realize how powerful it is a board with four wheels. Its more than just a sport, it is a culture, then you fully realize. Trends come and go sometimes others are just adaptations..., so maybe now we are just going through a "neo-ninetees" style but a little vagabond with IPHONE hahaha! cool! That's life. Cycles and cycles. I guess for previous generations to mine we were the rare ones for wearing skinny jeans and striped t-shirts, right?

 

Is there anything you miss from the 90's? Something remarkable from that time?

 

From the 2000's decade which is what I experienced, I miss many things ... like I said before has  been lost a bit of the essence that surrounds this culture, but maybe it is just nostalgic hahaha you must live in the present. Adapt the best you can and try to be faithful to principles. That  maybe are coming more from the 90 ´s or 2000s or 2010's who knows…

Photography by Sam Ashley

Nike SB | 2016 European Series

Nike SB | 2016 European Series

Nike SB presents the 2016 NIKE SB EUROPEAN SERIES, 4 stops across Europe giving skaters a platform to compete in the most vibrant cities on the continent.

BERLIN 2015 Yuri Facchini Hardflip BSNosegrind

LODON 2015 Kyron Davis Flip FSCrooked

The second stop, in June, lands in London, the home of some of the rawest skating in Europe, for the London AM at BaySixty6.
Crossing the channel the third and newest stop, the Paris AM, mixes authentic street with contemporary features at legendary street spot Le Dome, at the Palais de Tokyo. 

The final event of the series, in July, is once again the Berlin Open, hosted at the SB Shelter skatepark, an all-concrete facility that challenges AMs & Pros from around the globe.

With a total prize purse of €50,000 the 2016 NIKE SB EUROPEAN SERIES challenges amateur and professional skaters in parks designed to progress skateboarding at all levels of ability.

Skaters wanting to compete can register from the 9TH of May via nikesb.com/euroseries

 

Mark your calendar:

BARCELONA AM - SKATE AGORA
20 - 22 May

LONDON AM - BAYSIXTY6
3 - 5 June

PARIS AM - PALAIS DE TOKYO
14 - 15 June

BERLIN OPEN - SB SHELTER
8-10 July

Pizza Skateboards | Barcelona

Pizza Skateboards | Barcelona

Our friends from Pizza Skateboards visited Barcelona last summer on a filming trip for the first video of the brand. Find below some pictures of their stay in the city, also the video. You can see they wasted no time... 

Photography by Roger Ferrero